FROM COUNTERCULTURE TO CYBERCULTURE PDF

From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network, and the Rise of Digital Utopianism. Available at In the early s, . From Counterculture to Cyberculture has ratings and 44 reviews. Warwick said: This is a sad story in many ways: I wonder if the author realises quite. Journal of e-Media Studies Volume I, Issue 1, Spring Dartmouth College Fred Turner, From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth.

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Apr 06, Nicholas Su rated it it was amazing. Overall, a worthy read, even if scant on details with particular events I’d have liked to hear more about.

No trivia or quizzes yet. This is an important book about the culture that existed during the early years of the PC revolution and the creation of the Internet. Dec 25, Eli Weinstein rated it it was amazing.

From Counterculture to Cyberculture

From Counterculture to Cyberculture is the first book to explore this extraordinary and ironic transformation. Computer Science Culture Studies History: It basically argues that the counterculture ethos of the the ‘s had a profound affect on the libertarian formation of what has come to be called cybercjlture. A well-woven history of the ’60s counterculture, as personified in Stewart Brand, and its evolution into the cyberculture that came to countercultute in the s with the Internet boom and, in some small part, informs the digital culture of today.

This book is written by a guy with an advanced degree in English, yet it is completely readable and shows how things like narrative context can lose the scare quotes and actually be important to the way our world develops. I’m docking it one star only perhaps because of my own shortcomings as a reader due to lack of practice – this took me two years to finish. If you are after I got this as I really enjoyed Stewart Brand’s last book, and wanted to know more about him.

How was the citizens’ Internet ever anything but doomed. What I found most amazing about the book, however, is the naivety of otherwise coknterculture and foresighted people of what the Internet was and would become.

Jan 06, Dan rated it really liked it. Recommended mostly for mo A Little to academically dry for my tastes, but an interesting book nonetheless. If you are a student or an academic, then you might get on with this read. Here is an interview with the author. countervulture

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Aug 19, Jim Lemanowicz rated it really liked it. I’m not going to lie; I was swept along with Wired’s mid-’90s neon cyberspace revolution hype, without realizing it was always a future run by cybercklture. It was a slow read without knowing much of the background, but the content is still accessible for the casually curious. Nov 28, Aatif Rashid rated it really liked it. These intrinsic contradictions countercu,ture get us to appreciate and be ready to accept that the world is always more complicated than our ideas make of it.

Stewart Brand clearly forged important links between the counterculturalism of the s and the libertarian, cyber networks of our time, but Turner fails to make a case for his lasting importance or to demonstrate that our contemporary digital culture would have been significantly different if Brand had never existed. Between andvia such familiar venues as the National Book Award—winning Whole Earth Catalog, the computer conferencing system known as WELL, and ultimately, the launch of the wildly successful Wired magazine, Brand and his colleagues brokered a long-running encounter between San Francisco flower power and the emerging technological hub of Silicon Valley.

An excellent study of the history and relationship between the counter-culture of the 60s and 70s and the emergence of personal computing and the Internet. Sep 07, David rated it really liked it.

Bleak tools of the cold war, they embodied the rigid organization and mechanical conformity that made the military industrial complex possible. It’s definitely an important story, but to be honest I felt I had to work a little too hard to make it out in this book. Want to Read saving….

Formal and Complex Organizations. Jul 22, Kenny Cranford rated it it was ok Shelves: He retains careful awareness, but not in an overbearing way, of the hypocrisies and exclusionary aspects of the cultures examined.

Open Preview See a Problem? It connects us with how the internet, although originally designed as a cybercculture for the military to respond to a nuclear attack, it was interpreted by the counter culture movement as a potential tool to unite society.

Stewart Brand and the Whole Earth network. Lists with This Book. Bleak tools of the cold war, they embodied the rigid organization and mechanical conformity that made the military-industrial complex possible. The Shifting Politics of the Computational Metaphor 2. There are a myriad of fascinating little historical details that [Turner] dug up that will surprise and enlighten even the key players in the drama.

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Fred Turner here traces the previously untold story of a highly influential group of San Francisco Bay—area entrepreneurs: Countetculture chronicle of how a great countercultural icon countercultire Stewart Brand could morph into the father of digital utopianism, following in the footsteps of Marshall McLuhan is a fascinating trip down memory lane for me. In the early s, computers haunted the American imagination.

Jan 11, Bastian Greshake Tzovaras rated it really liked it. And though focused on revealing the importance of a political and cultural ideology within a network of people, Turner tells the story from the perspective of the lone genius entrepreneur. Twitter Facebook Youtube Tumblr. Feb 26, Sara Watson rated it really liked it.

From Counterculture to Cyberculture

The New Communalists eschewed political resistance of any kind–their way was to disengage and run away, build new lives for themselves on what they saw as a “frontier. Between andvia such familiar venues as the National Book Award—winning Whole Earth Catalogthe computer conferencing system known as WELL, and, ultimately, the launch of the wildly successful Wired magazine, Brand and his colleagues brokered a long-running collaboration between San Francisco flower power and the emerging technological hub of Silicon Valley.

Right-wingers began organising digital conferences, pallying up to the big names, and in return winning approbation and promotion from the digital community. I actually almost finished it, almost made it pages through before giving up in disgust. Nov 20, h. At the end of the performance, the cyberculturw would go down, and for ten minutes the audience would hear multiple “Om’s” from the speakers. Contained some great anecdotes but overall was very repetitive.

A well-researched profile of Stewart Brand and his cohort, illustrating not only the nuances of the historical connection between communalist strains of the 60s counterculture and internet optimism post-cyberdelia in a more careful and accurate way than What the Dormouse Said but the incredible power of Brand’s own reputation-building and power-building techniques which have been more recently cybercuulture by Tim O’Reilley.

Mike Holderness New Scientist. A bit of a dense academic read, not so much a Tom Wolfe book about Silicon Valley, but worth the ride.